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Shared Interests Group

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Nikolai Muravyov
Nikolai Muravyov

How To Buy A Public Company



What that means is that there's often a lot more access to information and the actual negotiating of the contract can be a little bit easier because you don't necessarily need to have the same level of diligence in the contract and there's a public valuation out there as well.




how to buy a public company


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That is not normal, but that is in the realm of possibility in extreme cases. But on the other hand, you do have to answer to shareholders. And because of that, you have fiduciary duties and other representatives and people you need to account for it which could add some complexity as it relates to options that a private company doesn't necessarily need to have.


With a public company, there's actually a mark out there. Anecdotally, public companies tend to be a little quicker to reset to that new norm. And our data, we've done a lot of analysis around this and our data suggests that it usually takes about six months for stocks to season. Private markets actually take longer.


PG: The CEO of a private company doesn't have that fiduciary responsibility because they do as well. It's just not as formulaic and process-oriented as it is for a public company. Because in a public company situation, you can get under more scrutiny.


DM: Oftentimes, it's also driven by how many shifts owner, how many quote-unquote shareholders or owners you have, and private companies tend to be a little more concentrated versus when you're a public company, you have a lot of shareholders where the board is representing though.


The market value changes depending on what's happening in the microenvironment. We already talked about we've seen a massive increase in valuation. And the public market valuation at times does not match what you have as your intrinsic value so you at least have a public mark out there.


If you're taking over a public company and that public company is located in another location, such as your operation, that brings along its own complexity because you're trying to delist a company from the stock exchange in that company. It brings across some different complexities and takeover laws, etc.


DM: Confidentiality and leaks can have a significant impact and pose a challenge when you're dealing with public companies, especially if you're dealing with a situation where there's a big stock component to the deal. So it's incrementally more important to keep things quiet in those situations.


DM: We see it two ways. One is to actually force to say we think this company is undervalued or we think there's a lot of strategic value here. It's being mismanaged, or there's a great kind of value here. So we think you should sell it yourself.


DM: One is just through issuing reports on the internet. The advent of social media has also produced a forum to be able to just broadly disseminate information because it's as much of a public perception story as it is an individual investor story.


The more formalized way depends on how contemptuous it gets. A lot of companies prefer to settle on the private, right? An activist doesn't necessarily go public on day one, they'll try and engage with a company in a private setting, and see if they can reach some sort of negotiation.


If things potentially escalate, then it might go public. But they could issue proxy board seats, but there are actually companies out there like solicitors and stopwatch firms that can also help in terms of reaching out to potential shareholders.


DM: An activist tends to be a fund that has a specific point of view on a company and they want them to do something different. And that can range from capital structure such as we think you're inefficiently deploying capital, and you should be returning more capital to shareholders.


PG: The most important thing you have to consider is the value to the existing investors. The board is a representative of the public investors. They will act based on what they think is right for the broader investor and investors in the company.


When you come to the table you have to bring value, which you think will pass muster. The second important thing is around the strategic rationale of a transaction. Does it make sense to take this company? It's a public company buying another public company, does it make sense for those two companies to come together? Is one plus one equal to three? What are synergies? All that has to pass muster in the public investor's eyes.


Stock-for-stock merger - shareholders of the target company will have their shares replaced with shares of stock in the new company. The new shares are in proportion to their existing shares. The share exchange is rarely one-for-one.


Tender offers - these offers involve a proposal by the investor to buy enough outstanding shares of the target company's stock to gain controlling interest of the company. This is sometimes considered a hostile takeover.


If you need help with answering the question, if a company is bought, what happens to the stock, you can post your legal need on UpCounsel's marketplace. UpCounsel accepts only the top 5 percent of lawyers to its site. Lawyers on UpCounsel come from law schools such as Harvard Law and Yale Law and average 14 years of legal experience, including work with or on behalf of companies like Google, Menlo Ventures, and Airbnb.


When a publicly traded company becomes a privately held company, the public company's shares are purchased at a premium by the investors buying the company. The company is delisted from the stock exchange where its shares formerly traded. Shares now can no longer be traded publicly."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What Happens to Shareholders When a Company Goes Private?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Shareholders agree to accept the offer to be bought out by investors. They give up ownership in the company in exchange for a premium price for each share that they own. They can no longer buy shares in the company through a broker.","@type": "Question","name": "What Happens to Private Shares When a Company Goes Public?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "When a private company goes public, for instance, through an initial public offering (IPO), private shares owned before the IPO may gain in value. However, they usually cannot be sold for a specific amount of time, starting on the day of the IPO. This period is known as the lockup period and may last 180 days."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsWhat Is Privatization?How Does Privatization Work?Interest in PrivatizationPrivatization and Shareholder FAQsThe Bottom LineCorporate FinanceM&AHow Does Privatization Affect a Company's Shareholders?By 041b061a72


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